Palm Bay Daily Weatherman Refuses To ‘Fall Back’

Clocks go back one hour on Sunday.
Clocks go back one hour on Sunday.

PALM BAY, Florida – Daylight Savings Time will be this Sunday at 2:00 a.m., when everyone must turn their clocks back by 1 hour.

This is good news for many as it will provide an extra hour of sleep on Monday before work.

However, some people are rejecting the idea of turning the clocks back.

The Palm Bay Daily weatherman, who lives in a van down by the river, will reject the annual tradition of falling back by one hour.

“As of Sunday, all weather reports will be off by one hour as they’re posted,” he said. “Why would I need an extra hour, my life is already miserable.”

Daylight saving time in the United States started as an energy conservation trick during World War I. It soon became a national standard in the 1960s.

The idea is to shift the number of daylight hours we get into the evening. So if the sun sets at 8 p.m. instead of 7 p.m., we’d presumably spend less time with the lights on in our homes at night, saving on electricity.

It also means that you’re less likely to sleep through daylight hours in the morning (since those are shifted an hour later too). Hence “saving” daylight hours for the most productive time of the day.

While our weatherman is refusing to recognize the time change, there are states that agree with him.

For example, the state of Massachusetts is in the early stages of considering a proposal to stay on daylight saving time year round. It involves shifting into Atlantic time — which is an hour ahead of Eastern time — and then staying there the whole year.

However, the plan is a longshot because the Massachusetts legislature and the Department of Transportation would both have to approve it.

If approved, other states may follow.

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Andy Hodges began his career in the field of radio and TV broadcasting where he worked for about a decade. The Jupiter, Florida resident then pursued computers as they were coming to market in the late 1980’s. Andy has owned a computer business, been a software programmer, and has worked as a Senior Systems Analyst/Engineer in the Information Technology sector in Atlanta. He eventually returned to the area in 2002. Andy is also the Editor-in-Chief for Sebastian Daily.
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